Central
High School
1801 Losey Blvd. S | La Crosse, Wisconsin 54601 | 608-789-7900 | FAX: 608-789-7931

Mrs. Bobbi Gillitzer

Bobbi Gillitzer

Central High School

Teacher

608-789-3088

bgillitz@lacrossesd.org

 

 History: gossip well told. ~Elbert Hubbard

 

Welcome! I can’t believe this is already my 17th year at Central! Outside of teaching, I love running, biking, reading, and spending time with my husband and daughter. I spend most of my time outside of school taking my 10-year-old daughter Ellie to all of her activities. She plays basketball, volleyball, and softball, and also runs track. My husband, who lives and breathes baseball, coaches at UW-LaCrosse. As a Badger alum, we love to cheer on Bucky, but when it comes to basketball, I bleed Duke blue  🙂

I feel truly lucky to be able to teach in a place like Central. Please feel free to call or email with any questions or concerns you have. Go Red Raiders!

P1030439

U.S. History  

Advances in War Technology

Advances in War Technology

 

Directions: Go to Central’s homepage.  Click on “Classrooms,” then “SS,” then “Gillitzer.”  Scroll to “U.S. History Notes.”  Click on Advances in War Technology. Use the sites to answer the worksheet questions.

 

The War in the Airhttp://www.firstworldwar.com/airwar/summary.htm

 

  1. When the war first started out was there a lot of usage of aircraft? (Paragraph 4)

 

 

  1. How much training did a pilot need in order to fly a plane in 1914? (Paragraph 8)

 

 

 

  1. By the end of the war, what three areas had been improved greatly? (Paragraphs 9)

 

 

 

  1. What is the difference between the “pusher” layout and the “tractor” layout for a plane? (Paragraphs 9&10)

 

 

  1. There are four main categories that aircraft were discovered, experimented with and refined. What are they? (Paragraph 13)

 

 

 

 

Weapons of War: Poison Gaswww.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/gas.htm

 

  1. What was the reason for the development and use of poison gas in WWI? (Intro.)

 

 

  1. Who used poison gas first in WWI? (Section 1)

 

 

  1. How did the Germans miss their opportunity to attack the French? (Section 4)

 

 

 

  1. Why was the effectiveness of poison gas diminishing in the war? (Section 12)

 

 

 

  1. What sort of protection was used to protect from Poison Gas? (Section 13)

 

Weapons of War: Machine Guns – http://www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/machineguns.htm

 

 

  1. Starting out in August of 1914, how would one describe the machine guns being used? (Intro. and Section 1)

 

 

 

 

  1. What did the British High command think about using the machine gun? (Section 2)

 

 

 

  1. When established in fixed point sites, was the machine gun successful? (Section 5)

 

 

 

 

  1. Most historical accounts of WWI tended to describe the strengths of the machine gun in battle as what? (Last Section)

 

 

 

  1. As the war developed what where machine guns adapted for use on? (Last Section)

 

WWI Battles/Weapons

Options for Battles or Weapons Graphic Organizer

Airplanes

Trench warfare

Convoy system

Flamethrowers

Grenades

Pistols

Machine Guns

Poison Gas

Rifles

Tanks

Trench mortars

1st Battle of Ypres

2nd Battle of Ypres

3rd Battle of Ypres

1st Battle of the Marne

2nd Battle of the Marne

1st Battle of the Somme

2nd Battle of the Somme

Gallipoli

Tannenberg

Belleau Wood

Cantigny

Chateau-Thierry

Meuse-Argonne

St. Mihiel

Verdun

1920s Webquest

1920s Web Quest

The Task:

The period after World War I was called the “Roaring ’20s”. Hollywood movies, magazines and other popular culture of the day made it seem like people in the 20’s did nothing but party. But historians and other students of the past consider the 1920s the beginning of modern America — a decade that helped set the tone for the rest of the century.

So, your task is to complete this Web Quest and record your answers in the following steps below.

The Process

Step 1: Let’s get a quick introduction to the 1920s. View the six web pages there and write a brief summary of the site (at least 1 paragraph). Just click on the links Roar or Yawn at the bottom of each page to continue to the next page at the site, Learner.org

Step 2: Check out Flapper Station for some genuine 1920s entertainment. Spend some time looking around at this site to get acquainted to the real 1920s. When you’re finished, find a fashion or fad to sketch that represents the 1920s. Write a brief description to explain it.

Step 3: The average yearly salary in 1925 was $1,236. How does this compare to the U.S. average salary today? Complete a Google search to find out the average salary today, then click on this link to calculate how the 1925 salary is worth in today’s money.

Step 4: Learn how installment plans increased consumption and led to the growth of consumer debt. Explain how installment buying changed the way Americans lived at the Installment Plans.

Step 5: Looking for a good deal? Check out the opportunities available in Florida during the 1920s at the Lawless Decade. View the timeline and click on the year 1924. Write a summary explaining the real estate bubble and how it burst.

Step 6: Next, take a look at some of the other issues at this site (Lawless Decade) and choose one to discuss. Write a summary of the issue you selected and explain its importance to the ’20s (1 paragraph).

Step 7: Finally use the Lawless Decade site again to learn how the stock market crashed in 1929. Explain what happened and what we learned from the Crash of ’29 (1 paragraph).

Another good site to research these questions is 1920-30.com Try this one if you can’t find the answers on the sites listed above.

1930s Webquest

Depression Era Webquest

People in History

President Franklin D. Roosevelt http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/fr32.html

  1. President Roosevelt was related to a man who had served as President of the United States before him. Who was that man, and how were the two men related?
  2. To what international organization did he devote much of his time into planning, prior to his death?

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/glimpse/firstladies/html/ar32.html

  1. What was her newspaper column called?
  2. How is Teddy Roosevelt related to Eleanor Roosevelt?

 

Jesse Owens http://www.jesseowens.com/about/

  1. How did Jesse get his nickname?

 

  1. Summarize his success in the 1936 Olympics.

 

 

The Rise of Adolph Hitler http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/riseofhitler/new.htm

 

 

  1. What was the name of the book Hitler wrote while in prison?

 

 

  1. Who was the Hitler Youth? Did girls belong to this group?

 

 

 

Orsen Wells http://www.transparencynow.com/welles.htm

 

  1. On October 30th 1938…What event did people think had happened to the earth?  List some things people heard on the radio.

 

10. How did listeners respond?

 

 

Charles Lindberg

11. Summarize the kidnapping of the Lindberg baby using the following site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindbergh_kidnapping

 

Historical Events

 

Dust Bowl http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/water_02.html

      12. What was the Dust Bowl?

 

13. Name 4 states it affected.

 

 

Hindenburg http://www.infoplease.com/spot/hindenburg1.html

 

14. What sort of rooms did the Hindenburg have in it?

 

15. Where was the Hindenburg scheduled to fly and how many passengers died?

 

We Made Do…Surviving the Great Depression

16. Choose from one of the letters written to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Read 2 letters. What were people asking Eleanor to do for them? http://newdeal.feri.org/eleanor/db0238.htm

 

 

Buildings of the 1930’s

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE http://www.inetours.com/Pages/SFNbrhds/Golden_Gate_Bridge.html

17. When did the bridge open?

 

EMPIRE STATE BUILDING http://history1900s.about.com/od/1930s/a/empirefacts.htm

18. How much did it cost to build?

19.  How long did it take workers to complete construction of the Empire State Building

 

Hey, what did people do for fun??

 

Monopoly http://www.answers.com/topic/monopoly-game
     20. Most of the places on the Monopoly® board game were named by the game’s inventor for places in a real U.S. city. What city is that?

 

Mickey Mouse http://www.hiddenmickeys.org/Secrets/Mickey.html

21. What was Mickey’s original name?

22. What was the password for the Invasion of Normandy?

 

 

 

 

Holocaust Webquest

Holocaust Webquest

 

Directions: Use Mrs. Gillitzer’s U.S. History website (under U.S. History assignments). Click on Holocaust Webquest. Use the links provided to answer the questions.

 

Task 1: Use the websites to answer the questions.

 

Adolf Hitler

http://www.history.co.uk/biographies/adolf-hitler

 

  1. Where was Hitler born?
  2. Early in his life, what career did Hitler hope to have?
  3. Summarize his role in WWI.
  4. When did Hitler become Chancellor of Germany?
  5. Why was Hitler not supposed to invade the Rhineland?
  6. How and when did Hitler die?

 

Attack on the Jewish

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005681

  1. What does anti-Semitism mean?
  2. What did the Nuremburg Laws do?
  3. What happened on Kristallnacht?

 

Heinrich Himmler

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/himmler_heinrich.shtml

  1. What did the outbreak of WWII allow Himmler to do in regards to Jewish people?
  2. What was the Final Solution?
  3. How did he die?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Task 2: Concentration and Death Camps

Use the links to help you label the map on the next page.

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_nm.php?ModuleId=10005144&MediaId=354

 

  1. Label the following bodies of water:

Atlantic Ocean           Black Sea        North Sea       English Channel

  1. Shade in the Axis Powers: Germany Italy
  2. Mark the following concentration camps

Bergen-Belsen           Ravensbruck              Dachau                       Buchenwald

  1. Mark the following death camps

Auschwitz                   Chelmo                       Treblinka                   Belzec

 

  1. What is the difference between an extermination camp and a concentration camp?

 

  1. Where were all of the extermination camps located?

           

 

 

Task 3: Nuremburg Trials

 

Google Nuremburg Trials. After reading about the trials, write 1-2 paragraphs summarizing the reason behind the trials and the results.

Cold War Webquest

Origins of the Cold War

Origins of the Cold War
http://www.historywiz.com/originscoldwar.htm

 

  1. What are two reasons the Soviets mistrusted the U.S.?

 

  1. What form of government was practiced by the Soviets?

 

Key Events and Dates of the Cold War
http://www.studyworld.com/newsite/reportessay/History/European%5CContainment_of_Communism-32441.htm

  1. What does the policy of containment mean?

 

The Yalta Conference
http://www.thenagain.info/WebChron/World/YaltaConf.html

  1. This site discusses the Yalta Conference of 1945 and its purpose. The conference set the Cold War into action by dividing Germany. Who were the Big Three at the conference?

 

  1. How was Germany divided?

 

  1. Who would control Berlin?

 

  1. What were the U.S., Britain, and Russia given “supreme authority” over for the end of WWII?

 

The Iron Curtain Speech
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/churchill-iron.html

 

  1. This site provides excerpts from Winston Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech about communism. Where did the Iron Curtain descend?

 

 

  1. Who was in control behind the curtain?

 

10. What did Churchill want to prevent from happening again?

 

Berlin Airlift

http://www.trumanlibrary.org/teacher/berlin.htm

11. What 5 countries did Russia take over during Truman’s presidency?

 

12. What was Bizonia?

 

13. Summarize the last paragraph- what happened between the Soviets and America in Berlin?

Cuban Missile Crisis

The Cuban Missile Crisis

 

CMC- Missiles in Cuba

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. Why did Russia want missiles in Cuba? (2 reasons)

 

 

  1. Who was the leader of Russia? Of Cuba?

 

 

CMC- Operation Anadyr

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/OPERATION-ANADYR-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. Khrushchev said the missiles were defensive. What did the US find out decades later about the missiles?

 

 

CMC- The Cuban Missile Crisis

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/THE-CUBAN-MISSILE-CRISIS-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. How many Americans would die if missiles were launched?

 

 

CMC- Ex-Comm and the Crisis

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/EX-COMM-and-The-Crisis-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. Who were Ex-Comm?

 

  1. What is quarantine?

 

  1. What was JFK worried about if he launched action on Cuba?

 

 

 

 

CMC- Clear and Present Danger

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/A-CLEAR-AND-PRESENT-DANGER-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. What would the US response be if Cuba launched a missile?

 

CMC- Eyeball to Eyeball

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/EYEBALL-TO-EYEBALL-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. What did Khrushchev say in response to the quarantine?

 

  1. “We were standing eyeball to eyeball and the other fellow blinked.” What does that mean?

 

CMC- Battle Plans

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/BATTLE-PLANS-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. Why was it a good thing the US didn’t invade Cuba?

 

  1. What was the big deal about reaching DEFCON 2?

 

CMC- Close to the Edge

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/CLOSE-TO-THE-EDGE-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. What did Khrushchev want the US to do regarding Turkey?

 

  1. What did Castro want to do to US planes?

 

CMC- The Truth

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/THE-TRUTH-on-ENDING-the-CRISIS-Cuban-Missile-Crisis

 

  1. Summarize the agreement Bobby Kennedy and the Soviet Ambassador agreed upon.

1960s Webquest

Life in the 1960’sDirections: Go to Central’s homepage. Click on “Classrooms,” then “SS,” then “Mrs. Gillitzer.” Scroll down to “U.S. History Notes.” Click on 1960 Webquest. Use the sites to answer the worksheet questions.
1. How the 60s Changed America http://chasemillis.hubpages.com/hub/How-the-1960s-changed-America1.  What were 3 ways politics changed during the 1960s?

 

2.  What were 2 ways entertainment changed during the 1960s?

 

 

2.The 1960’s from the Baby Boom view
http://www.bbhq.com/sixties.htmQuestions:1.  What did the baby boomers watch?
  • List 5 TV shows from 1960.

 

  • List 3 Cartoons from 1960.

 

2.  What did the following COST in 1962 & what do they COST today (approximately)?

Product1962 Price2016 Price
Candy Bar
Soft Drink
Gallon of Gas
1st Class Postage
Music Album
Popcorn @ movie
New Car
Hourly Wage

3.  What “boomer music” was HOT in 1962?  List 3.

4.  Woodstock Remembered…

  • Sketch a picture of the advertisement for Woodstock.

 

  • What was the price of a 1-day ticket?
  • What was the price of a 3-day ticket?
  • How many people were at Woodstock?
  • List 3 problems that occurred.

 

3. To the Moon…

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/apollo11.html#.VQGiamTF-Hx

  1. Watch the 2 minute video.
  2. When was the first moon landing?
  3. Who were the first 2 men on the moon?
  4. What is the name of the area on the moon where they landed the Eagle?

 

4. Hippieshttp://blastfrompast.wikispaces.com/Hippie+Culture

 

  1. What does the word counterculture mean?
  2. What were 3 main ideas of hippie culture?

 

  1. Where were the 2 main locations of hippie culture in the US?

5.

1960’s Slang: http://www.cougartown.com/slang.htmlQuestions:

1.  List 10 Slang words from the 1960’s AND write what they mean.

 

 

 

 

t goes here, click edit button to change this text.

White Privelege

Directions: Read each statement. Tally your score. The higher your score, the more privilege you have in your daily life. If you answer:

Yes= +1 No=  -1 Doesn’t apply to me= 0

1. I can arrange to be around people of my race most of the time (class and free time).

2. I can avoid spending time with people whom I was trained to mistrust and who have learned to mistrust my kind or me.

3. If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure of renting or purchasing housing in an area which I can afford and in which I would want to live.

4. I can be pretty sure that my neighbors in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me.

5. I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.

6. I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented.

7. When I am told about our national heritage or about “civilization,” I am shown that people of my color made it what it is.

8. I can be sure that my children will be given curricular materials that testify to the existence of their race.

9. If I want to, I can be pretty sure of finding a publisher for this piece on white privilege.

10. I can be pretty sure of having my voice heard in a group in which I am the only member of my race.

11. I can be casual about whether or not to listen to another person’s voice in a group in which s/he is the only member of his/her race.

12. I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race represented, into a supermarket and find the staple foods which fit with my cultural traditions, into a hairdresser’s shop and find someone who can cut my hair.

13. Whether I use checks, credit cards or cash, I can count on my skin color not to work against the appearance of financial reliability.

14. I can arrange to protect my children/siblings most of the time from people who might not like them.

15. I will not have to educate my children to be aware of systemic racism for their own daily physical protection.

16. I can be pretty sure that my teachers and employers will tolerate me if I fit school and workplace norms; my chief worries are not about others’ attitudes toward my race.

17. I can talk with my mouth full and not have people put this down to my color.

18. I can swear, or dress in second hand clothes, or not answer letters, without having people attribute these choices to the bad morals, the poverty or the illiteracy of my race.

19. I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial.

20. I can do well in a challenging situation without being called a credit to my race.

21. I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.

22. I can remain oblivious of the language and customs of persons of color who constitute the world’s majority without feeling in my culture any penalty for such oblivion.

23. I can criticize our government and talk about how much I fear its policies and behavior without being seen as a cultural outsider.

24. I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the “person in charge”, I will be facing a person of my race.

25. If a traffic cop pulls me over, I can be sure I haven’t been singled out because of my race.

26. I can easily buy posters, post-cards, picture books, greeting cards, dolls, toys and children’s magazines featuring people of my race.

27. I can go home from most meetings of organizations I belong to feeling somewhat tied in, rather than isolated, out-of-place, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance or feared.

28. I can be pretty sure that an argument with a peer of another race is more likely to get them in trouble than me.

29. I can be pretty sure that if I argue for the promotion of a person of another race, or a program centering on race, this is not likely to cost me heavily within my present setting, even if my colleagues disagree with me.

30. If I declare there is a racial issue at hand, or there isn’t a racial issue at hand, my race will lend me more credibility for either position than a person of color will have.

31. I can choose to ignore developments in minority writing and minority activist programs, or disparage them, or learn from them, but in any case, I can find ways to be more or less protected from negative consequences of any of these choices.

32. My culture gives me little fear about ignoring the perspectives and powers of people of other races.

33. I am not made acutely aware that my shape, bearing or body odor will be taken as a reflection on my race.

34. I can worry about racism without being seen as self-interested or self-seeking.

35. I can take a job with an affirmative action employer without having my co-workers on the job suspect that I got it because of my race.

36. If my day, week or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether it had racial overtones.

37. I can be pretty sure of finding people who would be willing to talk with me and advise me about my next steps in life.

38. I can think over many options, social, political, imaginative or professional, without asking whether a person of my race would be accepted or allowed to do what I want to do.

39. I can be late to a meeting without having the lateness reflect on my race.

40. I can choose public accommodation without fearing that people of my race cannot get in or will be mistreated in the places I have chosen.

41. I can be sure that if I need legal or medical help, my race will not work against me.

42. I can arrange my activities so that I will never have to experience feelings of rejection owing to my race.

43. If I have low credibility as a leader I can be sure that my race is not the problem.

44. I can easily find academic courses and institutions which give attention only to people of my race.

45. I can expect figurative language and imagery in all of the arts to testify to experiences of my race.

46. I can chose blemish cover or bandages in “flesh” color and have them more or less match my skin.

47. I can travel alone or with my spouse without expecting embarrassment or hostility in those who deal with us.

48. I have no difficulty finding neighborhoods where people approve of our household.

49. My children are given texts and classes which implicitly support our kind of family unit and do not turn them against my choice of domestic partnership.

50. I will feel welcomed and “normal” in the usual walks of public life, institutional and social.

WEB vs. Booker T.

Native American Map

Native American Map
A link to several maps showing different ways Native Americans were relocated in the U.S.

Wounded Knee

World's Richest

World’s Richest
The wealthiest people in the world. Did you make the list?

WWI Map

WWI Map
Use this for most of the locations.

How Rich Are You?

Market Watch

Market Watch
Use this site to get information on the current economy.

CNN Money

CNN Money
Use this site to find out about the current economy.

Cuban Missile Crisis

1960s Personalities

Trading Cards

Trading Cards
Use this site to create trading cards of important people.

U.S. History Course Expectations

 

Mrs. Bobbi Gillitzer

Room 314

Phone: 608.789.3088

Email: bgillitz@lacrossesd.org

 

The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited.

Mrs. Gillitzer’s Schedule

 

Period 1: U.S. History

Period 2: Prep

Period 3: U.S. History

Period 4: U.S. History

Period 5: U.S. History

Period 6: Prep

Period 7: Psychology

Period 8: Psychology

 

Commitments:

 

  1. I commit to working to help you learn and to making your achievement and understanding my first priority. I will commit to your success.
  2. In order to succeed, students need to be willing to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes. Students will need to put forth the honest effort necessary to be successful.
  3. I commit to being prepared for class, and expect the same from you. I commit to being enthusiastic and respectful towards each student.

 

Materials:

 

  1. A notebook/binder specifically for U.S. History
  2. Class handouts and additional resources
  3. Pen or pencil DAILY

 

Grading:

 

Scale:

            A: 90-100%

            B: 80-89%

            C: 70-79%

            D: 60-69% (Not yet mastered)

            F: 0-59% (Not yet mastered or Incomplete)

Quarter grades are 85% of each semester grade. Final exam are 15% of each semester grade.

There is a possibility of taking the final exam early if all assessments are completed & student is earning an A or a B. See me if you are interested in this opportunity.

 

The grade is a “weighted” grade. This means that there are categories under which a student earns points, and that they are not equal in determining the grade. The categories are as follows:

Formative assessments – 25% of the grade

Summative assessments – 75% of the grade

 

Formative assessments include, but are not limited to, homework, participation, in-class activities, etc. Summative assessments include, but are not limited to, quizzes, tests, projects, etc.

Late Work Policy

Late formative assignments will be accepted for full credit up to the last day of that unit. If a student receives a 70% or better on the summative assessment, missing formative assessments will not be required; however, all formatives must be turned in to take an early final exam.

If a student does NOT receive at least a 70% on the summative assessment, ALL formative assessments as well as any re-teaching activities assigned by the teacher before re-taking the test. Students who don’t complete the required work or don’t complete the retake in a timely manner will be referred to the office for assignment to MLT until the next grading period

Summative assessments that are not exams are expected to be turned in on time. Any student who turns in the summative assessment late will receive a 10% reduction in their final grade on that assessment. These assessments will be accepted until 2 weeks before the semester exam.

Retake Policy

Any student who receives less than a 70% on a summative assessment must redo that assessment. Students who receive above a 70% may also retake the assessment if they so choose. Arrangements to make up the assessment must be made with the teacher within 7 days after the assessment is returned. Full credit may be earned on any re-takes.

Students who receive above a 70% must complete the re-teaching activities and the make up before the end of the next unit.

Students who receive lower than a 70% must complete all formative assessments and re-teaching activities as well as the retake in a timely manner. Students who do not accomplish this will be referred to the office for assignment to MLT until at least the next grading period. Students will have to complete all retakes a minimum of 2 weeks before the semester ends.

Website: Assignments and notes are posted on my website. This is a great resource to use if the student has been absent and wants to find out what he/she missed, or if a student needs to access assignments or notes from home. To get to my webpage, go to www.lacrosseschools.org/central-high/. Choose “Classrooms,” “Social Studies,” “Bobbi Gillitzer.”

 

Parent input and communication is welcomed! If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to call or e-mail. I am looking forward to a great year!

APUSH  r

Course Expectations

APUSH Course Expectations

 

Mrs. Bobbi Gillitzer

Room 314

Phone: 608.789.3088

Email: bgillitz@lacrossesd.org

 

The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited.

Mrs. Gillitzer’s Schedule

 

         Period 1: U.S. History

Period 2: U.S. History

Period 3: Prep

Period 4: U.S. History

Period 5: U.S. History

Period 6: U.S. History

Period 7: Prep

Period 8: A.P. U.S. History

 

Commitments:

 

  1. I commit to working to help you learn and to making your achievement and understanding my first priority. I will commit to your success.
  2. In order to succeed, students need to be willing to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes. Taking an AP class is a challenge, and I will help you meet that challenge.
  3. I commit to being prepared for class. Each day, to the best of my ability, I will help you prepare for the AP exam in May.

 

Materials:

  1. A notebook/binder specifically for APUSH (really recommend both)-there will be LOTS of handouts.
  2. I would appreciate you writing your essays in blue or black ink. These are the easiest for me to read, and I want to be able to give you a score based on ALL your writing, not just what I can read.

 

Grading:

 

Scale:

            A: 90-100%

            B: 80-89%

            C: 70-79%

            D: 60-69% (Not yet mastered)

            F: 0-50% (Not yet mastered or Incomplete)

Quarter grades are 85% of each semester grade. Final exam are 15% of each semester grade.

 

 

The grade is a “weighted” grade. There are categories under which a student earns points, and that they are not equal in determining the grade. The categories are as follows:

Formative assessments – 25% of the grade

Summative assessments – 75% of the grade

 

Formative assessments include, but are not limited to, homework, participation, in-class activities, essays, etc. Summative assessments include, but are not limited to, quizzes, tests, projects, essays, etc.

Late Work Policy

Late formative assignments will be accepted for full credit up to the last day of that unit. If a student receives a 70% or better on the summative assessment, missing formative assessments will not be required or accepted.

If a student does NOT receive at least a 70% on the summative assessment, ALL formative assessments as well as any re-teaching activities assigned by the teacher before re-taking the test. Students who don’t complete the required work or don’t complete the retake in a timely manner will be referred to the office for assignment to MLT until the next grading period

Summative assessments that are not exams are expected to be turned in on time. Any student who turns in the summative assessment late will receive a 10% reduction in their final grade on that assessment. These assessments will be accepted until 2 weeks before the semester exam. (Jan 6th for 1st semester and May 22nd for 2nd semester. The second semester date will change for seniors)

Retake Policy

Any student who receives less than a 70% on a summative assessment must redo that assessment. Students who receive above a 70% may also retake the assessment if they so choose. Arrangements to make up the assessment must be made with the teacher within 7 days after the assessment is returned. Full credit may be earned on any re-takes.

Students who receive above a 70% must complete the re-teaching activities and the make up before the end of the next unit.

Students who receive lower than a 70% must complete all formative assessments and re-teaching activities as well as the retake in a timely manner. Students who do not accomplish this will be assigned to MLT until at least the next grading period. Students will have to complete all retakes a minimum of 2 weeks before the semester ends.

Website: Assignments and notes are posted on my website. This is a great resource to use if the student has been absent and wants to find out what he/she missed, or if a student needs to access assignments or notes from home. Go to www.lacrosseschools.com/central. Choose “Academics,” “Social Studies,” “Bobbi Gillitzer.”

 

Parent input and communication is welcomed! If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to call or e-mail. I am looking forward to a great year!

Psychology  psych

Neuroscience for Kids- The Human Brain

Neuroscience for Kids

INSTRUCTIONS: Click on this link- https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/introb.html

 Scroll down to the section entitled “Brain Basics.”

1. Click on the site called “Lobes of the Brain.”  Look at the diagram on this page and notice the location of each lobe. From the information provided, give a specific description of the functions of each lobe:

 

    1. Occipital Lobe
    2. Frontal Lobe
    3. Temporal Lobe
    4. Parietal Lobe

 

2. Scroll down to the bottom of this page and find the section about Phineas Gage. Here you can see some pictures of his skull which is now on display at Harvard’s School of Medicine. Click on the link “More about poor Mr. Gage.” On the next page, click the link “Phineas Gage’s story.” Skim the story about his accident. What changes were evident in Gage’s behavior and abilities as a result of the damage to his frontal lobe?

 

3. Click back 3 times to the page showing the “Brain Basics” section. Click on “The Brain – Right Down the Middle.” Read the descriptions of the following brain areas and explain their functions in your own words:

 

    1. The Cerebral Cortex
    2. The Cerebellum
    3. The Hypothalamus
    4. The Thalamus

 

4. Click back one page again. Under “Brain Basics,” click on the link “1 Brain or 2 – Split Brain Experiments.” Scroll down to the section labeled “Right side-left side.” Read the information there and answer the following questions:

 

 

    1. What percentage of right-handed people show a left-side of the brain dominance for language?
    2. What percentage of left-handed people show a left-side dominance for language?

 

Scroll down further on this page to the box with the picture showing a woman/man’s face.

    1. Which face would a split-brained person POINT TO if asked to point to the normal face? With which hand?
    2. When asked to VERBALIZE which face they see, which one would they say?

 

 

5. Click back again to the prior page. Click on the link “She Brains, He Brains.”       Answer these two questions from this site:

 

    1. At birth, how much larger is a typical male brain compared to a female brain?
    2. What has research shown so far about differences in intelligence and specialized abilities between men and women?

 

 

6. Click back again to the prior page and click on the link “Brain Size/Cerebral Cortex.” Look at the chart that compares the brain weight of various species and make the following comparisons:

 

    1. Cat vs. Dog?
    2. Elephant vs. Human?
    3. What specific biological explanation is offered as to why brain weight by itself does not correlate with intelligence?

 

Brain Labeling

Directions: Go to http://www.g2conline.org/. At the top right, click on “3-D Brain.” A new window should pop up. Use the scrolling tool in the lower-right corner of the window to move the brain between medial, lateral, dorsal and ventral views. Then, use the drop-down menu on the left-hand side to select various parts of the brain. Complete the questions below using the information provided.  Use bullet points, not complete sentences.

Frontal Lobe

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Broca’s Area

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Parietal Lobe

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Occipital Lobe

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Temporal Lobe

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Wernicke’s Area

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Cerebellum

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Brain Stem

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Corpus Callosum

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Amygdala

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Hippocampus

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Hypothalamus

Where is it located?

What is it’s function?

Disorders associated with this part of the brain:

What are the effects if it is damaged?

Anything extra from Mrs. G’s notes:

Left Brain, Right Brain

Left Brain/Right Brain Dominance

Go to the following website   http://frank.mtsu.edu/~studskl/hd/learn.html  Click on the hemispheric dominance option, read the paragraph on right brain vs. left brain.

1. What does the left side of the brain control?

2. What does the right side of the brain control?

Click on the inventory at the bottom of the page.  Answer as truthfully as you can.  When you are done you will be told how many right brain answers you chose and how many left brain answers you chose.

Right brain  __________ Left Brain  ___________

3. Are you left or right brain dominant?

4.  How do you process information the best?  Use the cognitive processing to help you with this.

5. Now read through the left brain/right brain comparisons.  What things will help you study/process information better? 

Crazy Little Thing Called Love

Crazy Little Thing Called Love

Each group should write down your definition of LOVE.
Resources:  100 love songs                Top 100 Country love songs

 

These are songs from my generation that show many different emotions associated with love and romance. Place the song into a theme as they are played (themes are below).

Where do the following love song fit?  If need be, add a theme.
Patrick Swayze- She’s Like the WindLyrics

Bryan Adams- I Do It for YouLyrics

U2- With or Without YouLyrics

The Police- Every Breath You TakeLyrics
Edwin McCain- I’ll BeLyrics

Oasis- WonderwallLyrics

Celine Dion- My Heart Will Go OnLyrics

Garth Brooks Thunder Rolls Lyrics

Beyonce Crazy in Love Lyrics

Bon Jovi Livin’ on a Prayer Lyrics

REM Everybody Hurts Lyrics

John Cougar Mellencamp Jack and Diane Lyrics

Back Street Boys I Want It That Way Lyrics

 

Has your definition of love changed?

Goals:  What is this thing called love?  How do you explain it?  Do love songs help us understand how to deal with love?   By looking at our recording industry, can we come up with a definition of love, then and now?  Have love songs changed from one generation to another?  What social implication can we attach to love and romance and a better life? Is there such a thing as true love?  Do we as a society place too high a priority on finding love?  These are all questions you should be able to answer.

Task:  Find a partner. Your group (2 people) must decide on two love songs====== that meet your definition or demonstrates an attitude about love in our society today.  Groups will take turns presenting their love song with lyrics on screen.  As other groups present, place their love song in one of the themes below or into an entirely new theme category that you create.

How do the older era songs compare to your generations of love song?
Evaluation or analysis:  
Have the message and words changed?  What do the songs and lyrics say about our culture and love, now compared to then?  Have the songs you and other groups presented offer some insight into this crazy thing called love?  Use some data or evidence that can explain how generational changes have affected our society?

Presentation:   Present finding and views.

Prepare a short summary of your findings about love songs and answers to questions above.  Share in class and written explanation turned in (evaluation analysis).